Thursday, 10 March 2016

149) “Throughout thousands of years the same constellations have remained fixed in their same patterns without moving out of position whatsoever. If the Earth were a big ball spinning around a bigger Sun spinning around a bigger galaxy shooting off from the Biggest Bang as NASA claims, it is impossible that the constellations would remain so fixed. Based on their model, we should, in fact, have an entirely different night sky every single night and never repeat exactly the same star pattern twice.”

Yet again, Mr Dubay neither discusses or understands the numbers involved. Although the speeds at which the Earth, The Sun and the Galaxy are moving are large, the distances between them are larger still. So any observable change takes a very long time. One example was given when we talked about the North Star, Polaris.

If you want some figures, the following will give you some idea just how big the universe is, and why we are moving at a snails pace comapered to thos dstances, howver fast it may seem on a earth-bound scale.





 “our Sun and the Earth are moving at about 43,000 miles per hour (70,000 km/hr) roughly in the direction of the bright star Vega in the constellation of Lyra. This speed is not unusual for the stars around us and is our "milling around" speed in our suburban part of the Galaxy.”

A light-year equals 5.88 million million miles (9.46 million million kilometres) and the nearest star beyond our sun  is 4.37 light years from the Sun (5.88e+12 miles)  - so it would take 136744186.047 hours to reach the nearest star at our present rate.

That is 15,610 years.

In other words, since we developed primitive astronomy around 3000 years ago, we have travelled less than one fifth of that distance. On a larger scale, our galaxy  is about 100,000 light years across. 

Relative to a star half-way across the galaxy, the whole solar system has travelled 1/50,000 of that distance. Is it surprising that we don’t see visible changes in our angles of view with such minute changes?



Can you see how wildly ridiculous is   the claim that “we should, in fact, have an entirely different night sky every single night and never repeat exactly the same star pattern twice”?

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