Thursday, 10 March 2016

168) “So-called “satellite” phones have been found to have reception problems in countries like Kazakhstan with very few cell phone towers. If the Earth were a ball with 20,000+ satellites surrounding, such blackouts should not regularly occur in any rural countryside areas.”


Give sources and details, please, Mr Dubay. 

Without them, how can we check your claims, find out whether they are true, and if they are, look at other more likely explanations? 

Like a gap in the satellite coverage, for example? If you don’t give sources, your claim is empty.

Geostationary satellites have a limitation of use in latitude, generally 70 degrees north of the equator to 70 degrees south of the equator. This is a result of look angles being so low on the horizon increasing the chances of terrestrial and other interference from sources in the same frequency bands.
Another disadvantage of geostationary satellite systems is that in many areas—even where a large amount of open sky is present—the line-of-sight between the phone and the satellite is broken by obstacles such as steep hills and forest. The user will need to find an area with line-of-sight before using the phone. This is not the case with LEO services: even if the signal is blocked by an obstacle, one can wait a few minutes until another satellite passes overhead, but a moving LEO satellite may drop a call when line of sight is lost.

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satellite_phone#Satellite_phone_network

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